Chuck McFadden
December 12, 2016

Any hope that California would soon settle into some sort of accommodation with a Trump Administration is fading rapidly.

During the past two weeks, this happened:

President-elect Donald Trump named Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as his choice to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the federal enforcer of rules governing clean air, clean water, toxics cleanup and other chores. The choice of Pruitt, an energy industry supporter who is skeptical of the impacts of climate change and has sued the EPA over the years, sparked outrage from environmentalists across the country, especially in California.

Becerra, the son of Mexican immigrants, has denounced Trump for “outrageously offensive” utterances on the character of Mexicans. He is already being dubbed the public face, along with Brown, of California Democratic opposition

In California, viewed internationally as a leader of efforts to curb greenhouse gases that form the cornerstone of Gov. Jerry Brown’s political program, the administration was not pleased.

“Next commander-in-chief picks climate change denier-in-chief to lead @EPA. We’ll stand our ground. CA’s ready. #ActOnClimate,” tweeted Brown chief of staff Nancy McFadden on Dec. 7.

“If Trump were ever elected, we’d have to build a wall around California to defend ourselves from the rest of this country,” Brown told labor organizers at a spring dinner in Sacramento, the Sacramento Bee reported. “By the way that is a joke. We don’t like walls, we like bridges.”

Brown nominated Xavier Becerra, the fourth most powerful Democrat in the House, the House’s ranking Latino and no fan of Donald Trump, to be California attorney general, one of the most powerful and visible posts in state government.

Becerra, the son of Mexican immigrants, has denounced Trump for “outrageously offensive” utterances on the character of Mexicans. He is already being dubbed the public face, along with Brown, of California Democratic opposition to Trump on a number of highly visible issues dear to California Democrats — immigration, climate change and health care.

As attorney general, Becerra would be the central figure in legal battles against Trump Administration attempts to undo California actions on those issues.

“The state’s pro-worker positions, mandating higher wages and decent benefits for millions of Californians, may be eroded in the long run by what’s sure to be Trump’s war on unions.” — Harold Meyerson.

Then, about 100 UC Davis medical students held a “code blue” rally on the on the Sacramento medical campus to dramatize their fears for about how health care in California would fare under Trump. “Code Blue” is physician jargon for a medical emergency. Students said they are worried about what might happen to patients if Trump follows through on his campaign call to repeal Obamacare.

They may be right to worry: Yanking federal funding from Covered California, the state’s version of Obamacare, could leave the state with an $18 billion fiscal crisis and leave millions of people without health coverage.

“Neither Obamacare, much less the ability of California residents here illegally to buy into it, are likely to survive. Sanctuary cities may be threatened with a loss of federal funds,” Harold Meyerson, the executive director of the American Prospect, wrote shortly after the election in the L.A Times opinion section.

“The state’s pro-worker positions, mandating higher wages and decent benefits for millions of Californians, may be eroded in the long run by what’s sure to be Trump’s war on unions,” he wrote.

Recently, a group of AIDS activists, survivors and relatives of AIDS victims rallied in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park to observe the 23rd annual World AIDS Day. Speakers expressed fear of what might happen in the fight against the virus under Trump.

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