Gov. Jerry Brown signs one of the hundreds of bills he has left to deal with as Garciela Castillo-Krings, right, his deputy legislative secretary, looks on Friday at his Capitol office in Sacramento. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Gov. Jerry Brown signs one of the hundreds of bills he has left to deal with as Garciela Castillo-Krings, right, his deputy legislative secretary, looks on Friday at his Capitol office in Sacramento. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

By Jessica Calefati
jcalefati@bayareanewsgroup.com
Posted: 10/12/2015 06:02:18 AM PDT
Updated: 10/12/2015 06:03:01 AM PDT

SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown often quotes erudite authors and ancient texts to help explain his thinking. But in a raft of vetoes issued ahead of Sunday’s midnight deadline to act on legislation, his message came through loud and clear — Legislature, you messed up.

Lawmakers this year neglected several of the governor’s priorities, including his desire to replace an expiring tax on health care plans. He also wanted to find funding for badly needed roadway repairs. Lashing out, Brown used his veto pen to punish them and draw attention to his agenda.

“Without the extension of the managed care organization tax that I called for in special session, next year’s budget faces the prospect of over $1 billion in cuts,” Brown wrote in a veto message issued Saturday for nine bills authored by Democrats that would have offered only modest tax credits and cost the state relatively little.

Overall, Brown vetoed 133 of the more than 800 bills that landed on his desk during the legislative session that ended last month, making his veto rate for the year 14.1 percent. That’s higher than each of the past two years and about the same as 2011, his first year in office, when he predicted lawmakers would be singing the “veto blues.”
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Those vetoes attracted considerable attention over the weekend, but Brown also signed several key bills Sunday. The governor endorsed measures that ban the use of “Redskins” as a school mascot; require day care workers to be vaccinated against infectious diseases; and better protect transgender youth in foster care.

In a statement, Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins said she was “deeply disappointed” by the governor’s decision to veto legislation authored by Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, that sought to boost construction of low-income housing by offering builders a temporary tax break.

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