Beau Yarbrough, Staff Writer
Posted: 09/01/2012 11:48:19 AM PDT

RANCHO CUCAMONGA – Five years after being indicted, the two men accused of helping cause the collapse of California’s largest charter school will have to wait a little longer for their day in court.

California Charter Academy founder C. Steven Cox and former Hesperia mayor Tad Honeycutt were indicted in September 2007 on 117 felony charges between them, related to alleged illegal transactions between CCA and a for-profit subsidiary run by Honeycutt.

When it collapsed in August 2004, CCA had 36 schools around the state. An audit commissioned by the state Department of Education released in April 2005 accused Cox, Honeycutt and a number of High Desert elected officials of misappropriating $23 million in state and federal funds. The charges that were ultimately filed against Cox and Honeycutt – the two mentioned most often in the audit, by a wide margin – center on $5.5 million in alleged illegal transactions between CCA and a for-profit subsidiary run by Honeycutt.

Cox is charged with 56 counts of misappropriation of public funds, 56 counts of grand theft and a single count of failing to file a tax return. If convicted, he faces up to 64 years in prison.

Honeycutt was charged with 15 counts of misappropriation of public funds, 15 counts of grand theft, three counts of failure to file a state tax return and a single count of filing a false tax return. If convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison.

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